What is true about the Virginia Plan quizlet?

Under the Virginia Plan, Congress was to be made up of two houses, the House of Representatives and the Senate, and the number of lawmakers that a state could send to Congress depended on the state’s population. States with large populations would have more representatives than smaller states would have.

What is one fact about the Virginia Plan?

The Significance of the Virginia Plan was: The Virginia Plan played an important role in setting the overall agenda for the convention. The Virginia Plan called for a strong national government. The Virginia Plan was the first document to suggest a separation of powers into executive, legislative, and judicial branches.

Which statement about the Great Compromise is accurate?

Which statement about the Great Compromise is accurate? It merged the ideas of multiple delegates’ plans.

What is the main argument for the Virginia Plan?

The purpose of the plan was to protect the large states’ interests in the new government, which would be stronger federally than under the Articles of Confederation.

How did the Virginia Plan differ from the Articles of Confederation?

How were the Articles of Confederation different from the Virginia Plan? Under the Virginia Plan, the representatives would depend on the population. Where under the Articles of Confederation, only gave each state one vote. … Where in the Virginia Plan, representation was based on population.

What was the effect of the Virginia Plan?

The Virginia Plan was notable for its role in setting the overall agenda for debate in the convention and, in particular, for setting forth the idea of population-weighted representation in the proposed national legislature.

What were the advantages and disadvantages of the Virginia Plan?

What were the advantages and disadvantages of the Virginia Plan? The advantage is two governments would govern the people individual state government and national government and they would get their power from the people. The disadvantage is representation.

Why was the Virginia Plan introduced and amended and the New Jersey Plan introduced and rejected?

According to the Virginia Plan, states with a large population would have more representatives than smaller states. … This position reflected the belief that the states were independent entities. Ultimately, the New Jersey Plan was rejected as a basis for a new constitution.

Why is the Virginia Plan better than the New Jersey Plan?

The Virginia Plan is better because it’s basically saying that representation is based on the size of the state. If you have a big state and one representative, it won’t work because one person can’t make decisions for the whole state. The more representatives there are, the better it will be for the state.

What are some advantages of the Virginia Plan?

The Virginia Plan

The legislature was more powerful, as it chose people to serve in the executive and judicial branches. Legislature Two houses (bicameral). The House of Representatives was elected by the people and the Senate was elected by the state legislatures. Both were represented proportionally.

How was the Virginia Plan and New Jersey Plan similar?

While each plan did have many differing ideas, they both did want the new government to be separated into three branches, with each branch having a separation of powers and the ability to balance each other out. You probably recognize this as the system of checks and balances.

What were the differences between the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan?

The Virginia Plan wanted a legislature in which states received representation in proportion to the size of their population, while the New Jersey plan wanted a legislature that gave each state equal representation, regardless of the size of its population.

How did the Virginia Plan aim to improve the structure of the national government?

The Virginia Plan aimed to improve the structure of the national government by proposing that a central government be divided into 3 branches – legislative, executive, and judicial.

Why did Pennsylvania support the Virginia Plan?

James Wilson of Pennsylvania argued that since the Virginia Plan would vastly increase the powers of the national government, representation should be drawn as directly as possible from the public.

What might be true about the United States government today if the Virginia Plan had been adopted?

What might be true about the United States government today if the Virginia Plan had been adopted? Legislation favoring large states would be passed. EXPLANATION: The Virginia Plan allocated representation according to population and gave large states an advantage in Congress.

How did the Virginia Plan and New Jersey Plan lead to the Great Compromise?

The Virginia Plan was used, but some ideas from the New Jersey Plan were added. The Connecticut Compromise established a bicameral legislature with the U.S. House of Representatives apportioned by population as desired by the Virginia Plan and the Senate granted equal votes per state as desired by the New Jersey Plan.

How did the Virginia Plan address the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation?

What was the major problem with the Articles of Confederation? … How did the Virginia Plan address the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation? It proposed three branches of government, including a strong executive. How was the national government organized under the Virginia Plan?

Did the Federalists support the Virginia Plan?

During this time, many compromises were formed to appease regional factions. The Great Compromise brought together the New Jersey Plan and the Virginia Plan to create the Constitution ‘s legislative system. … The Federalists did not want a bill of rights —they thought the new constitution was sufficient.

Which issue did the Virginia Plan the New Jersey Plan and the Great Compromise address at the Constitutional Convention 1787?

Proposal by delegates from New Jersey at the Constitutional Convention to benefit smaller states by creating a unicameral national legislature in which every state had equal representation; the Great Compromise of 1787 combined this plan with the Virginia Plan to create a bicameral legislature in which representation …

What was true about the New Jersey Plan?

The New Jersey Plan was meant to protect the interests of the smaller states from being trampled by the larger states. The plan called for one vote per state in Congress rather than having votes based on representation, since that would benefit the larger states.